2011 Aug 30 Brunei Sight Syawal Cresent 1432

Bandar Seri Begawan – The astronomical Society of Brunei Darussalam (PABD) carried out the moon crescent observation at Agok Hill in the afternoon. The weather was very cloudy and the moon crescent was only observedย for a few minutesย from 18:55 local time through telescopes, binocular and naked eyes.

The 31-hour-old new moon crescent visible through a telescope at 18:55 local time from Bukit Agok, August 30, 2011.
The 31-hour-old new moon crescent visible through a telescope at 18:55 local time from Bukit Agok, August 30, 2011.
A few minutes before the sunset. The weather condition was partly cloudy.
A few minutes before the sunset. The weather condition was partly cloudy.

Present at the observation were Pengiran Shahdani (Vice President II), Awang Hj Mohamad Azri (Exco) and 4 other members.

The result of the observation was submitted to Islamic Crescents’ Observation Project (ICOP). See worldwide observation result here.

Assigned vantage points throughout the country couldย sight the new moon of Syawal 1432 H. The official announcement of the sighting was also made on TV and Radio and Brunei Darussalam starts Aidilfitri tommorrow, 31 August 2011.

Visibility Predictions for the New Crescent Moon 1980 – 2030

This is a table computed by Her Majesty’s Nautical Almanac Office computes and distributes predictions of lunar crescent visibility for Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam from Year 1980 until 2030.

Visibility Predictions for the New Crescent Moon are catagorised by
A Easily visible
B Visible under perfect conditions
C May need optical aid to find the crescent Moon
D Will need optical aid to find the crescent Moon
E Not visible with a telescope
F Not visible, below the Danjon limit

Download below:

2007 July 15 First Crescent Sighted

"The crescent was captured on 15 July 2007 @ 6.50 pm (Bukit Shahbandar) with Olympus E-500 Digital camera attached to a 10 inch LX-200 with  focal reducer." said Hj Mahadi based on his ICOP report.
“The crescent was captured on 15 July 2007 @ 6.50 pm (Bukit Shahbandar)
with Olympus E-500 Digital camera attached to a 10 inch LX-200 with
focal reducer.” said Hj Mahadi based on his ICOP report.

The first crescent or hilal was visible from this country during the new moon sighting by the Survey Department on July 15. Based on the account, the moon’s altitude was
about 10.465 degrees, elongation of 11.223 degrees and it was 22 hours 33 minutes old at sunset. The visibility based on Mooncalc indicates that on 15th July 2007, the new moon should be easily visible from many parts of the world but ICOP report generalised, Brunei being the first eastern country to sight the new moon crescent.

Congratulation to the moon sighting committees of the Survey Department.

THE DANJON LIMIT OF FIRST VISIBILITY OF THE LUNAR CRESCENT

By Louay J. Fatoohi, F. Richard Stephenson & Shetha S. Al-Dargazelli Department of Physics, University of Durham

When the distinguished French astronomer Andre Danjon was the director of Strasbourg Observatory, he became engaged in determining the light curve of the Moon. In 1931 he noticed that the Moon of August 13, which was only 16.2 hr before new, extended only 75-80ยฐ from cusp to cusp. In other words, Danjon found that the outer terminator of the crescent was considerably less than a complete half-circle, which it should have been theoretically. This was not an isolated observation because other observations, and also examination of previous records, showed that this shortening of the crescent was a general and real phenomenon. Danjon also noticed that the shortening diminishes as the angular distance of the Moon from the Sun increases.

Visibility of the lunar crescent

By Bradley E.Schaefer NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661 Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA

Prediction of the first visibility of the lunar crescent is a difficult problem involving astronomy, meteorology, and physiology. Historically, this problem has been attacked by an empirical approach where some set of observations is used to deduce a criterion for visibility. In this paper, I present a list of 201 observations and their observing circumstances for use in deriving and testing prediction algorithms. I find that criteria involving the moonset lagtime and the Moon’s age are quite bad in their predictive ability. Criteria involving the relative altitude and azimuth of the Moon at sunset are better, yet still can yield incorrect predictions within a zone of uncertainty with a width of over 105 degrees in longitude. The new theoretical model of Schaefer ( 1 988) is found to have a zone of uncertainty with an average total width of 47 degrees in longitude.